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pptpd-1.3.0-0

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This implements a Virtual Private Networking Server (VPN) that is
compatible with Microsoft VPN clients. It allows windows users to
connect to an internal firewalled network using their dialup.

pptpd-1.3.0-0

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This implements a Virtual Private Networking Server (VPN) that is
compatible with Microsoft VPN clients. It allows windows users to
connect to an internal firewalled network using their dialup.

Hardware Should Defend Itself

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We are surrounded by opportunities to break our gear; if the gear is smart enough, it simply lasts longer.

When I worked at Motorola, as any development and innovative company has, we had a number of tricks and workarounds. One of these was a modified cable used to load firmware like they do to handsets in the factory — a Factory Cable, or FC. In this case, it drew power from the host system.

This cable would toast USB ports, therefore I caused it to get the official name “EFC” or “Evil Factory Cable”

I just realized the hard way that some domestic PCs protect themselves — as they should to as many actions as could possibly damage the system yet remain undetectable to a support guy. In this case, mine just protected itself:

USB Self-Defense

How cool is that? Sure, a Dell is “just as good but cheaper”; often you get what you pay for. Paying a dollar to protect my system from a mistake that I can make, as a technology genius (Genius, I tell you!), that’s a simple choice to make. If only more people would consider their gear over the long-term.

Accidental Reuse – a Recurring Theme

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Compatibility only helps the user, and in sourcecode, the re-user.

I’ve noted before that making up a new format for anything poses a low chance of being compatible with anything, and that compatibility is accidental at best. Choosing any other format to be compatible with, to form some agreement, means that you already have compatibility with one other existing entity, meaning:

  • you can learn from the comments and notes about what that project’s architect discovered and learned
  • whatever is compatible with that entity maybe accidentally compatible with your product
  • generic upstream tools require much less work to adapt to your tool
  • compatibility with anything means you have designed with compatibility in mind, so you’re not so wedged into a colloquial hole as the next guy

The counter-point, by choosing your own way, no matter how much better you may think it is, you’re now responsible for evolving and supporting all the tools that are in your users’ toolbox. This means that if decide, for example, that Julian dates shall be used, you generate a gap between your project and all the tools that don’t yet support Julian dates. Even if you have no competition in the world, your users have these little obstacles that build up. Faced with a knock-off of your fantastic tool that poses no such obstacles, you’ll soon be replaced.

I like to get things done. Finish, and go home, or hack on something else.

There is the feeling of “I hate having to fix my tools before I can use them to get stuff done” that actually pushes me away from Microsoft — even before they “evolved” the Office suite to use a random new UI. Indeed, rather than Julian dates, that “Ribbon Menu” now makes OpenOffice more compatible with our learned skill at Microsoft Office than Microsoft is.

This “Ribbon Menu” breaks residual knowledge; in forcing users to accept this impact to productivity, what benefit is the Ribbon Menu giving to users? If you’re going to break with the pack, have a good reason other than “we’re going back to how it was done before 16-bit CPUs were invented”.

By changing your users to a better interaction that is used by some other app, you support that app, you consolidate the UI that should have been described from the start, and you gain compatibility. You might accidentally gain compatibility with a few tools that work on that other project or tool.

For these reasons, I would ask:

On a new project: what are you compatible with?

If the answer is “nothing” or “an old 8-bit format” or “the dead language of spoken latin”, rethink your decision, if you ever considered the possibility of compatibility, to marching to the common drummer of the blizzard of possible standards.

On an existing project: are you going to turn down anything that consolidates user experience or formats?

Keep in mind, the next question could be “what will you do next year, when your competition appears, and has compatibility?”

RT: Travel too much, Dopplr and Tripit

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I travel a great deal — 82 of 130 days so far — and I like to share that info.

OK, maybe I don’t like to keep telling people where I am 🙂 I understand it’s interesting to some, and I appreciate the attention and concern people have for me, but it’s easier if I can embed a bunch of rich links, and people can take a look for themselves. I am significantly affected by interruptions, and I also foster independence where I can.

The web has built up in a number of competing paths, like how NYC Subway was as many as four different companies in competition before they merged, leaving more inactive stations than active ones, and a lot of unused tunnels where squatters live.

Some people don’t read travel sites, some use dopplr, some use tripit. I want to offer this information to both so that the person can use whatever they have used thus far. Tripit has a wider understanding of existing travel formats — itineraries and notices and such — but dopplr has some users, so it makes sense to feed dopplr from tripit to leverage tripit’s higher intelligence. Dopplr added ical subscription in 2008 which James Senior nailed, and Jon Udell shared thusly:

Then I realized that Tripit publishes an iCalendar feed, and that Dopplr can subscribe to iCalendar feeds. So I made that connection, and now my Tripit events are showing up in Facebook.

Well, this isn’t working today — consistent 410 errors — but maybe this can be averted with some constructive UserAgent settings. Maybe Tripit became tired of people leveraging its smarter service to feed Dopplr. Need more time to figure this out after I do my Expenses. (ugh) Dopplr does allow a push of a calendar from iCal, which is nice but may require my iCal to start/stop regularly to do the push/update. Hmm. There has to be a way to script that… 🙂

Eventually, either Dopplr, Tripit, or something that these spawn will become the disused stations of the web, but in the meantime, if someone is using that and can hit their shared info rather than call me at 2am in a strange timezone, it gives me more sleep 🙂

dns2tcp-server-0.5-1

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Dns2tcp is a tool for relaying TCP connections over DNS. There is no
authentications nor encryption mecanisms : DNS encapsulation must be
considered as an unsecure and anonymous transport layer. Ressources should
be public external services like ssh, ssltunnel …

This package contains the server part.

dns2tcp-client-0.5-1

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Dns2tcp is a tool for relaying TCP connections over DNS. There is no
authentications nor encryption mecanisms : DNS encapsulation must be
considered as an unsecure and anonymous transport layer. Ressources should
be public external services like ssh, ssltunnel …

This package contains the client part.

dns2tcp-server-0.5-1

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Dns2tcp is a tool for relaying TCP connections over DNS. There is no
authentications nor encryption mecanisms : DNS encapsulation must be
considered as an unsecure and anonymous transport layer. Ressources should
be public external services like ssh, ssltunnel …

This package contains the server part.

dns2tcp-client-0.5-1

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Dns2tcp is a tool for relaying TCP connections over DNS. There is no
authentications nor encryption mecanisms : DNS encapsulation must be
considered as an unsecure and anonymous transport layer. Ressources should
be public external services like ssh, ssltunnel …

This package contains the client part.

dns2tcp-server-0.5-1

RPM No Comments »

Dns2tcp is a tool for relaying TCP connections over DNS. There is no
authentications nor encryption mecanisms : DNS encapsulation must be
considered as an unsecure and anonymous transport layer. Ressources should
be public external services like ssh, ssltunnel …

This package contains the server part.

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